Education News » October 2015

Monthly Archives: October 2015

Education

How to evolve management

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shawn murphy bookThe term management has baggage. It’s associated with conclusions that no longer benefit a business or its people. Management is linked to controlling people, monitoring their progress, dominating them. The truth is management has become soulless. It’s rote. It’s impersonal.

Let’s look at some data that points the way towards the impersonal nature of management. In a Towers Watson study, fewer than half of the participants agreed that their senior management was genuinely interested in their well-being. Strategy and learning consultancy Root found that 68% of employees believed their manager was more interested in their own development rather than spending time inspiring employees to do their best work.

Hold these two findings up against dismal engagement levels and low trust in senior leaders and corporations, an unsatisfying picture of management emerges.

Management is one of the greatest inventions. It’s time for it to evolve, however. To what, though? Management needs to evolve to stewardship.

Evolving management

Stewardship is a shift in leadership mindset. With this mindset a steward accepts responsibility for the greater good of the business. A steward isn’t drawn to the allure of self-interest, says Gary Hamel in “What Matters Most.” A steward accepts responsibility for the people in his care. Management expert Peter Block explains that stewards don’t feel the necessity to set goals for employees, as if they can’t do it themselves.

If there’s a simple way to describe stewardship, it’s this way: Stewards shape the work context so that human potential is unleashed.

 

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Education

Face-to-Face vs. Online Learning: Why Is It Either/Or?

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In the film The Intern, a 70-year-old senior citizen named Ben Whittaker (Robert DeNiro), applies for a “senior” internship with a fashion tech start-up experiencing explosive growth. The interview process requires him to submit a video. Uncertain how to make a video, Ben enlists his nine-year-old grandson and wows the company with his warmth and personality. Ben gets the job.

He brings real-life experience to his new role, and his high EQ brings dividends to the company’s fast-moving, overcommitted CEO, who learns to appreciate and value Ben for his sincerity and integrity. His “old school” approach finds him in a suit and tie each day, while his younger colleagues wear t-shirts and don’t shave. Ben’s charm is that he is skilled at and values conversation.

In “Reclaiming Conversation,” a recent New York Times op-ed piece, Professor Sherry Turkle writes:

But it is in this type of conversation — where we learn to make eye contact, to become aware of another person’s posture and tone, to comfort one another and respectfully challenge one another — that empathy and intimacy flourish. In these conversations, we learn who we are.

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Education

Will STEM Education Be The Child Left Behind?

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President Obama checks out the moon as he talks with Agatha Sofia Alvarez-Bareiro, a high school senior from Brooklyn, N.Y. The occasion was the second-ever White House Astronomy Night.

President Obama checks out the moon as he talks with Agatha Sofia Alvarez-Bareiro, a high school senior from Brooklyn, N.Y. The occasion was the second-ever White House Astronomy Night.

Susan Walsh/AP

Leaders in business, education and politics love to talk up how important Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) education is for America’s future.

Innovations! Jobs! Progress! are all at stake, they often argue.

 

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Education

No Child Left Behind: What Worked, What Didn’t

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The Elementary and Secondary Education Act hasn’t been updated since it was renamed “No Child Left Behind” in 2001 by President George W. Bush. The law was introduced by President Lyndon Johnson in 1965 to help states level the playing field for students living and learning in poverty.

Matt Rourke/AP

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Cross your fingers.

Congress is trying to do something it was supposed to do back in 2007: agree on a rewrite of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. It’s not controversial to say the law is in desperate need of an update.

The ESEA is hugely important, not just to our nation’s schools but to the social fabric. It pours billions of federal dollars each year into classrooms that serve low-income students. When President Lyndon Johnson first signed it in 1965, he declared the law “a major new commitment of the federal government to quality and equality in the schooling that we offer our young people.”

The ESEA is supposed to be updated every few years but hasn’t been rewritten since 2001, when another Texan, President George W. Bush, famously renamed it No Child Left Behind. Bush took Johnson’s original vision, to help states level the playing field for students living and learning in poverty, and added teeth.

 

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Education

How to reinvent yourself as a leader as technology evolves

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 “Learn how to think like an 8-year-old,” Mike Walsh, author of FUTURETAINMENT and CEO of innovation research lab Tomorrow, said at this year’s PMA Fresh Summit in Atlanta on how to engage the next generation of consumers. Why an 8-year-old? Because anyone born after 2007 will have a completely different view of the world, he elaborated, as exposure to technology fundamentally changes us.

“The next generation of consumers, after a childhood of disruptive technology, will think about shopping, cooking, eating and fresh produce in ways very different from the rest of us,” he said. “Convergent technologies and connected lifestyles mean that everything, even food, is now a digital product.”

Technology and data will challenge our relationship to products and brands, and Walsh pointed to Instagram as one tool that has changed people’s perception of food.

“There’s a fine line between technology and anthropology,” Walsh said.

 

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