Education News » December 2015

Monthly Archives: December 2015

Education

How The Heck Do You Pay Off Your College Loans?

Published by:

42-56449912_custom-656e1ea9b5bc71186e6cc94f31960825b66f2730-s400-c85
Bjorn Rune Lie/Ikon Images/Corbis

Even some of those seeking the nation’s highest office have weighed in on college debt with payment plans and relief proposals. Voters and the media ask for details on the campaign trail. And that highlights a remarkable shift: Policymakers and politicians are paying attention to this issue like never before.

And it’s not as simple or cynical as trying to woo the important student vote. The fact is, the student loan burden in America is second only to mortgages in consumer debt. The government estimates that some 41 million students together owe more than $1.2 trillion.

Continue reading

Education

The 70/20/10 rule and considerations for teacher growth and development

Published by:

new-70-20-10-001

How do we most effectively promote the professional growth of our teachers so that it has a high impact on student learning?

While significant efforts are made in so many schools to improve teacher professional growth and learning, I continue to question how can we do this better?

Essentially, how can we ensure greater application of our own learning to ensure that it benefits our schools, teachers and students?

Continue reading

Education

Priority for schools in 2016: Character education to prevent bullying

Published by:

bullying-300x199
This month, SmartBlog on Education shines a light on reader trends, content roundups and expert forecasts for 2016. In this blog post, character education expert, former classroom teacher and blogger Serena Pariser challenges teachers, principals and parents to consider ways to prevent bullying by focusing on changing habits from the inside out.

Every year we come back from our winter break with fresh ideas and new perspectives for our schools and classrooms. Although one of the biggest issues facing schools, we still do not have a universal answer to bullying prevention — perhaps until now. As a teacher for 10 years, the sad truth is that it was inevitable that I would witness bullying. I would like to think I tried everything and essentially had bullying under control in my classroom. Under control isn’t enough. It only requires a single victim for something terrible to occur. One nasty look, a single shove, or one snide comment can scar a child. Even the most experienced and vigilant teachers in the most well-managed and caring environments can’t see everything that happens in their classroom.

Continue reading

Education

3 ways to address email frustration in schools

Published by:

shutterstock_174381557

Email is a great, convenient way to communicate. In many ways it can be exciting, similar to how we used to wait for the postman to deliver us that special letter that we had been waiting for. While there are similarities, there are a whole lot of frustrations around email to the point that some are claiming that it is ruining their life. I probably would not go as far as that but, certainly, email, is creating a lot of frustration, especially for teachers and support staff in schools.

There are a number of articles and blog posts on the Web that discuss the topic of email frustration in business and ways to improve staff morale by addressing email concerns that are worth a read but how do we address this problem in our schools?

Continue reading

Education

How A School’s Attendance Number Hides Big Problems

Published by:

absent-students1_slide-2ea4cc6ffe499e9150004047662097cc1bd143f5-s800-c85

LA Johnson/NPR

Every morning, the familiar routine plays out in hundreds of thousands of classrooms: A teacher looks out over the desks, taking note of who’s in their seats and who isn’t.

On any given day, maybe there are one or two empty chairs. One here, one there. And that all goes into the school’s daily attendance rate.

But here’s what that morning ritual doesn’t show: That empty desk? It might be the same one that was empty last week or two weeks ago. The desk of a student who has racked up five, 10, 20 absences this year.

It’s called chronic absence. The official definition: missing more than 10 percent of the school year — just two days a month.

Continue reading

Education

Google Hit With A Student Privacy Complaint

Published by:

texas-momentum-1_vert-68833dd0e353b65773b8cc7a45753808bbef7af3-s400-c85

Google Chromebooks and Google Apps for Education in use in Arlington, Texas.

Google products are growing as ubiquitous in classrooms as dry-erase markers. The most recent numbers show that more than half of classroom computers purchased for U.S. schools are low-cost Chromebooks. And 50 million students, teachers and administrators use Google Apps For Education, a group of tools that includes Gmail, Google Calendar, Google Docs and the purpose-built Google Classroom.

This software is free to use, for the most part. But a nonprofit advocacy group called the Electronic Frontier Foundation says there is a hidden cost: data mining that potentially compromises students’ privacy.

EFF has filed a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission, charging that Google is in violation of a legally binding agreement signed by 200 companies called the Student Privacy Pledge.

Continue reading