Education News » January 2016

Monthly Archives: January 2016

Education

Growing Numbers Of Chinese Teens Are Coming To America For High School

Published by:

1--chinese-students-american-hs-40b2964aa6eaf2794b0050d7606fa98c9185a15d-s800-c85

Sophomore Morgan Wang (center) takes part in a rehearsal of The Miser at Arroyo Pacific Academy in Arcadia, Calif., last November. Wang plays Marianne in the play.

Maya Sugarman/KPCC
In a high school theater in Arcadia, Calif., Amber Zhang and the rest of the teenage cast of a production of Molière’s comedic play The Miser gather in a tight circle.

“Everyone say, ‘Hey, hey, hey!’ ” bellows Xochitl-Julisa Bermejo, an instructor at Arroyo Pacific Academy. “Helloooo!”

Zhang, cast as a spunky ingénue, throws her body — and pipes — into the exercise.

Continue reading

Education

Leading with research in mind

Published by:

leadership1-300x199
SmartBlog on Education this month is exploring the science of learning. Join us for original content in which experts explore trends in learning research and highlight teaching strategies that can help improve student performance.

Much and more has been written about student learning. And it well should be, as the learning of all students — whether young or old — is how we help our society, and the people who make it up, to be the best possible. Lately, happily, even more of that writing has been researched-based. Consider, for instance, the column written regularly by Sarah Sparks for Education Week that focuses on how we learn and what the research says about that. Or, an increasing reliance on research connected to the Next Generation Science Standards in all of the National Science Teachers Association’s peer-reviewed journals.

Continue reading

Education

A ‘No-Nonsense’ Classroom Where Teachers Don’t Say ‘Please’

Published by:

nnn_custom-3c0472f241d6a452d5e1e0f02249df1c5eb5fa92-s800-c85

Annette Elizabeth Allen for NPR

Any classroom can get out of control from time to time. But one unique teaching method empowers teachers to stop behavior problems before they begin.

You can see No-Nonsense Nurturing, as it’s called, firsthand at Druid Hills Academy in Charlotte, N.C.

“Your pencil is in your hand. Your voice is on zero. If you got the problem correct, you’re following along and checking off the answer. If you got the problem incorrect, you are erasing it and correcting it on your paper.”

Math teacher Jonnecia Alford has it down pat. She then describes to her sixth-graders what their peers are doing.

“Vonetia’s looking at me. Denario put her pencil down — good indicator. Monica put hers down and she’s looking at me.”

Continue reading

Education

For Some Schools, Learning Doesn’t Stop On Snow Days

Published by:

virtual-learning_slide-a9388bca87f073bcc0f65e8daf8af84c6bbb2008-s800-c85

LA Johnson/NPR

For kids up and down the East Coast, the snow that piled up over the weekend translates into a day or two without school. But in other parts of the country, snow days are taking on a new meaning.

Students in Delphi, Ind., are expected to log onto their classes from home when schools are closed for snow.

The seniors in Brian Tonsoni’s economics class at Delphi Community High School are no strangers to technology — everybody has an Internet-connected laptop or smartphone in front of them in class as they work on business plans.

“We made a company, and so we are selling scarves,” says Hannah Napier.

Continue reading

Education

What research says about classroom technology

Published by:

students-and-cellphones-300x199

SmartBlog on Education this month is exploring the science of learning. Join us for original content in which experts explore trends in learning research and highlight teaching strategies that can help improve student performance.

“But why do you want students to blog?” This question, posed by one of the professors for an action research course in our school district, gave everyone pause. We had been discussing questions to investigate in our classrooms. The teacher who proposed the blogging idea thought for a moment, then replied, “I don’t know.”

Technology is tempting to embed in the classroom en masse. It piques kids’ interests and it is fun to explore. But does it lead to achievement and help students grow as learners? We need to ask ourselves these types of questions if we want to realize the impact that connected education can have on students. I offer three declarations supported by research to help assess the necessity of technology in classrooms.

Continue reading

Education

The Trouble With Talking Toys

Published by:

talking-toy_slide-b9cd120c4c5fa2f0e854e73a2684e04a26569918-s800-c85

Just because a toy’s packaging says it’s educational doesn’t make it so. That’s the finding from a new study in JAMA Pediatrics that found some toys being marketed as language promoters got in the way of learning.

Research shows that for kids to understand, speak and eventually read or write a language, they need to hear it — lots of it. And it’s never too early for parents and caregivers to get talking. That explains the booming industry in talking electronic toys that claim to help kids learn language.

The study focused on roughly two-dozen children between the ages of 10 and 16 months old. Researchers outfitted them with little microphones tucked into special vests or shirts that could record the infants playing at home with Mom or Dad.

Professor Anna Sosa, of Northern Arizona University, led the study and says she gave families three different kinds of toys to play with: books, traditional toys like stacking blocks and a shape sorter, and electronic toys.

“We had a talking farm — animal names and things,” Sosa says of the electronic toys. “We had a baby cellphone. And we had a baby laptop. So you actually open the cover and start pushing buttons, and it tells you things.”

 

Continue reading