Education News » March 2016

Monthly Archives: March 2016

Education

How students with ADD, ADHD can benefit from technology

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Students with attention-deficit disorder face unique challenges. Here, education expert Barbara Dianis offers ideas for how tech tools can help better support to these students. My son was in the third grade when he was diagnosed with attention-deficit disorder (ADD). His teacher, during a parent conference, told me that though my son was bright and creative, he often drifted in class, struggled to retain information and had difficulty completing assignments on time, on his own. She gently suggested I have him tested for ADD. A trip to his pediatrician a week later confirmed she was right.

Fast forward 14 years. That same child is now in the home stretch of his senior year at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He whipped most of the challenges he faced as a student with ADD. He is punctual, self-directed and can focus for sustained periods of time.

And we owe much of his success to technology. Phone apps helped him learn and master time management skills. He attended high school online and was highly successful. The environment suited his learning style and he developed effective study skills.

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Education

Why Science Teachers Are Struggling With Climate Change

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Many middle and high school science teachers are getting climate change wrong.

That’s according to the results of a new, national teacher survey backed by the National Center for Science Education and published in the journal Science.

Before we get to those results, a quick, climate science refresher is in order.

NPR science correspondent Christopher Joyce says the world’s major scientific organizations are now clear on global warming:

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Education

How Parents And Teachers Can Nurture The ‘Quiet Power’ Of Introverts

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When Susan Cain wrote Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking in 2012, it was a big success. The book made the cover of Time magazine, spent weeks on the New York Times best-sellers list and was the subject of one of the most-watched TED Talks, with more than 13 million views.

From that grew The Quiet Revolution, a company Cain co-founded that continues to produce and share content about, and for, introverts. The site offers an online training course for parents and stories submitted by readers about being introverted. There’s even a podcast.

Kids, Cain says, “are at the heart and center of it.”

“Introverts often are really amazing, talented, gifted, loving children, and they feel like there’s something wrong with them,” she says. “And our mission is to make it so that the next generation of kids does not grow up feeling that way.”

I talked with Cain about her mission of supporting introverts, and asked her advice on how to teach them.

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Education

Study In Your PJs? What A High School ‘Work From Home Day’ Looks Like

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One cold Monday this month, all the students of Park Ridge High School stayed home: wearing their PJs, munching on pretzels and Oreos, hanging out on the couch.

It wasn’t a snow day or measles epidemic. It was the school’s first Virtual Day, where in-person classes were replaced with written lessons and real-time video chats delivered online.

The idea arose because the school, just north of New York City in Park Ridge, N.J., issued every student a Mac laptop last year, says Tina Bacolas, the school’s head of instructional technology.

The school chose a software system called Schoology that allows students and teachers to communicate by text and video and post assignments.

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Education

Learning Environments Are About Space(s) and Time

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Having a panel discussion with the topic of “learning spaces” being one of the topics (check out some awesome spaces on the #LearningSpaces hashtag on Twitter),  one of the ideas that jumped in my mind was the importance of both the “space” and “time.”  What I mean by that is you can develop the coolest “learning spaces” ever, but if the time is not there to really go deep with our learning, how useful is the space?

Here is what I mean…imagine you develop the best space ever, with flexible seating and it started to look more like a “Starbucks” than a traditional classroom, yet the bell rings every 40 minutes or hour for students to go on to the next class.  What does the space matter if you do not have the time to utilize it?  Imagine being in the state of “flow” in these rooms, and moving from one amazing learning space to another, five or six times in the day; does the space really matter if we are in the cattle herding mentality of school?

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Education

Giving students out-of-the-box experiences on a budget

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I am in my fifth year as superintendent of Es​therville Lincoln Central Community School District in Northwest Iowa. Estherville is a town of 6,600 located near the beautiful “Lakes Area” of Iowa. We have approximately 1,380 students enrolled in four schools: two elementary buildings, one middle school and one high school.

As a rural school district, our biggest challenge is being able to create opportunities for students to see the world through a global perspective. We are limited in the cultural experiences we are able to provide our students, and yet we must prepare them to enter a workforce or higher education where they will no longer be working in the isolation of our rural communities. ​

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