Education News » September 2016

Monthly Archives: September 2016

Education

7 Steps to Be a Better Advocate for Your Students

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7 steps to be a better advocate for your students
Recently I participated in an outstanding Twitter chat (#satchat) about advocating for students. It’s such an important topic. Almost every teacher is successful with the top tier students. The top students seem to learn almost in spite of the teacher—good, bad, or indifferent. But to reach students who have significant struggles, at school or home or both, requires a teacher who is willing to be an advocate.
Educators have the opportunity to influence and support students who need a helping hand. We can lend them our strength for a time and help them find the strength within themselves to carry forward.

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Education

Half Of Professors In NPR Ed Survey Have Used ‘Trigger Warnings’

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This school year, the University of Chicago has put the debate over “trigger warnings” on campus back in the news. The University told incoming freshmen that, because of its commitment to freedom of expression, it does not support warnings to students about potentially difficult material.

But amid all the attention to trigger warnings, there have been very few facts about exactly how common they are and how they’re used.

NPR Ed sent out a survey last fall to faculty members at colleges and universities around the country. We focused specifically on the types of institutions most students attend — not the elite private universities most often linked to the “trigger warning” idea.

We received more than 800 responses, and this month as the issue once again made headlines we followed up with some of those professors.

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Education

I Ran 8.8 Miles To School Each Day. Barefoot. And It Was Worth It!

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It’s been 27 years since my last conversation with my mother. Like many girls born in rural Uganda in the late 1950s, she did not finish school before she was married off. She often told me, “I never got my degree but one day, my little man, you will.”

She instilled in me the value of the education she was not able to complete. Holding my small hand, she guided my right forefinger as she taught me how to scribble my ABCs in the dust. She taught me English by pointing to a tree, hut or cow and asking me to repeat their English names after her. She then translated the same words into our mother tongue of Runyankole. When I was frustrated, I’d ask, “Mama, why do I have to learn these foreign phrases?”

As if foretelling the future, she held her pen right before my eyes. “Here is your pen, hold it firmly, for it and this new foreign language will be your compass to navigate this world.”

My mother died of breast cancer when I turned 6.

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Education

Preschool Suspensions Really Happen And That’s Not OK With Connecticut

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This story is part of a series from NPR Ed exploring the challenges U.S. schools face meeting students’ mental health needs.

Every year, thousands of children are suspended from preschool.

Take a second to let that sink in.

According to the U.S. Department of Education, 6,743 children who were enrolled in district-provided pre-K in 2013-14 received one or more out-of-school suspensions.

And that’s just public pre-K. Still more children were likely suspended from the nation’s many privately-run preschools and day cares.

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Education

Reimagining the Modern Classroom

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We asked prominent voices in education—from policy makers and teachers to activists and parents—to look beyond laws, politics, and funding and imagine a utopian system of learning. They went back to the drawing board—and the chalkboard—to build an educational Garden of Eden. We’re publishing their answers to one question each day this week. Responses have been lightly edited for clarity and length.

Today’s assignment: The Space. Describe the perfect classroom.

Education

After 25 Years, This Teacher Says It’s All The Paperwork That Made Him Quit

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After 25 years of teaching, Rick Young won’t return to his history classroom this fall.

“This became my home,” he says. “This is a unique, special place,” talking about Daniel C. Oakes High School, where he has spent his entire career.

It’s a small public school outside Denver for students who’ve struggled with traditional education. For some, it’s their third or fourth try at high school — and they know it’s probably the last stop. And many, because of teachers like Young, finally find success.

Like Ryan Hostetler. He says he didn’t expect to finish high school. Then he met Young.

“He’s the most effective writing teacher I’ve ever had the experience of being taught by, and that includes literature writing classes at the graduate level,” he says.

After graduating, Hostetler decided to become a teacher, too.

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