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Judge Sides With University In Legal Fight With Student Newspaper

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The William T. Young Library on the campus of the University of Kentucky in Lexington, Ky.

Andy Lyons/Getty Images

The judge presiding over an open records fight between the University of Kentucky and its own student newspaper, The Kentucky Kernel, has sided with the university.

In his Tuesday ruling, Fayette Circuit Court Judge Thomas Clark agreed with the University of Kentucky that there is no way to release investigative documents without compromising the identities of the alleged victims, two graduate students who allege their professor sexually harassed and assaulted them. Clark also ruled that such documents fall under the federal privacy law that protects student records.

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Education

After 50 Years, Head Start Struggles With Uneven Quality

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LA Johnson/NPR

For more than 50 years, Head Start has provided free early childhood education and other services to low-income families. But new national research, out Wednesday, shows great variation from state to state in how well the program works.

The study comes from the National Institute for Early Education Research, and it examined Head Start programs in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and U.S. territories.

It focused on quality and ranked states accordingly. Kentucky and Vermont came out the best, while 18 states ranked very poorly: Arizona, Alabama, California, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia and Wisconsin.

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Education

For College Students With Kids, Getting Cheap Child Care Is A Challenge

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Student parent.

Ever heard that term? It’s used for a student who is also a parent, and there are nearly 5 million of them in colleges around the country. That’s over a quarter of the undergraduate population, and that number has gone up by around a million since 2011.

It can be really, really expensive to be a student parent, especially if you need to pay for child care while you’re in class.

In some states, child care for an infant can cost as much as $17,062 a year, according to a report by Child Care Aware of America. Add that on to the ever-rising cost of college tuition — both private and public — and the financial strain of getting a college education becomes a huge burden for low-income parents. So much so that only a third of student parents get a degree within six years, often citing mounting debt as a reason for dropping out.

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Education

Does Your State Provide Good Data On Your Schools? Probably Not

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Stuart Kinlough/Getty Images

So you’re trying to find some information about the schools in your community. Did students perform well on tests? How many students in a school are from low-income families? What’s the demographic breakdown? Most folks would start to look for this by searching the web. But, depending on the state you live in, finding that information can be a real challenge.

That’s according to a new report from the Data Quality Campaign. Analysts there spent 100 hours last summer looking at annual report cards put out by all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

 

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Education

No Child Left Behind: What Worked, What Didn’t

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The Elementary and Secondary Education Act hasn’t been updated since it was renamed “No Child Left Behind” in 2001 by President George W. Bush. The law was introduced by President Lyndon Johnson in 1965 to help states level the playing field for students living and learning in poverty.

Matt Rourke/AP

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Cross your fingers.

Congress is trying to do something it was supposed to do back in 2007: agree on a rewrite of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. It’s not controversial to say the law is in desperate need of an update.

The ESEA is hugely important, not just to our nation’s schools but to the social fabric. It pours billions of federal dollars each year into classrooms that serve low-income students. When President Lyndon Johnson first signed it in 1965, he declared the law “a major new commitment of the federal government to quality and equality in the schooling that we offer our young people.”

The ESEA is supposed to be updated every few years but hasn’t been rewritten since 2001, when another Texan, President George W. Bush, famously renamed it No Child Left Behind. Bush took Johnson’s original vision, to help states level the playing field for students living and learning in poverty, and added teeth.

 

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