Education News » Blog Archives

Tag Archives: Minnesota

Education

Gallaudet President Navigates From World Of Hearing To Sound Leadership Of The Deaf

Published by:

2016-12-15-gallaudet-roberta-cordano-portrait-002-edit_custom-6acc222522bf24182d08c64dc3b5dd8427819dd2-s800-c85

Gallaudet University President Roberta Cordano speaks using American Sign Language in her office in Washington, D.C. She is the first Deaf woman president at the university.

Becky Harlan/NPR

In its 152-year history, Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C. never had a deaf female president — until a year ago. Roberta Cordano is the first deaf woman to lead the school.

Gallaudet is a liberal arts university devoted to deaf and hard-of-hearing students. Classes are taught in American Sign Language, and all students and faculty are required to know how to sign.

But president Cordano never attended a deaf school herself.

“I grew up during a period of time when it was believed that American Sign Language was what they called a monkey language,” Cordano says, speaking through an interpreter provided by Gallaudet. While the interpreter translates rapidly, Cordano whispers out faintly in English as she signs.

Continue reading

Education

For College Students With Kids, Getting Cheap Child Care Is A Challenge

Published by:

m_fabrizio_collegesparents_custom-f45c864e702266d83f6e0da4483569dc49eea27b-s800-c85
Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Student parent.

Ever heard that term? It’s used for a student who is also a parent, and there are nearly 5 million of them in colleges around the country. That’s over a quarter of the undergraduate population, and that number has gone up by around a million since 2011.

It can be really, really expensive to be a student parent, especially if you need to pay for child care while you’re in class.

In some states, child care for an infant can cost as much as $17,062 a year, according to a report by Child Care Aware of America. Add that on to the ever-rising cost of college tuition — both private and public — and the financial strain of getting a college education becomes a huge burden for low-income parents. So much so that only a third of student parents get a degree within six years, often citing mounting debt as a reason for dropping out.

Continue reading

Education

After 25 Years, What’s Next For Charter Schools?

Published by:

gettyimages-166835907_sq-a0f4dae8499cd1c17a19b7a5cb5b1cecac8ebc6a-s400-c85
Oivind Hovland/Getty Images

The major advocacy group for charter schools is meeting this week in Nashville, Tenn., and there’s lots to celebrate.

What began with a single state law in Minnesota has spread to a national movement of nearly 6,800 schools, serving just under 3 million students.

But at its annual meeting, the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools is also using the moment to call for a fresh look at how these innovative public schools are managed and how they’re held accountable.

Among the concerns is whether the failure rate of online charter schools is hurting the credibility of the movement in general.

Continue reading

Education

Green Eggs, Ham And Metaphysics: Teaching Hard Ideas With Children’s Books

Published by:

cd7a3024-edit_slide-5078ea1dc0c0b0af29b23e7a465f3352c6bb73f6-s800-c85

What is language? What is beauty? Who gets to decide?

Philosophers have grappled with these questions for centuries, and they’ve generated a pile of long (and often tortured) books in their efforts to answer them.

But for Tom Wartenberg, some of the best books about philosophy are much shorter and a lot more colorful: Frog and Toad Are Friends. Horton Hears a Who! The Paper Bag Princess.

Every spring at Mt. Holyoke College in South Hadley, Mass., Wartenberg offers Philosophy 280: Philosophy for Children. Once a week, he loads his students into a bus and drives them to the Martin Luther King, Jr. Charter School of Excellence in nearby Springfield.

Continue reading