Education News » Blog Archives

Tag Archives: npr

Education

Students Who Get Better Career Guidance Remember College More Fondly

Published by:

college-happiness_slide-c70c5d1b0c33c53f2f79e5c109fc8e7ec4541052-s800-c85
LA Johnson/NPR

Of all of the departments universities cultivate, career services could be the most important.

A new survey of 11,483 college graduates, for the Gallup-Purdue Index, found graduates who reported “very helpful” campus career-services experiences were 5.8 times more likely to say their university prepared them for life after college, 3.4 times more likely to recommend their school and 2.6 times more likely to donate to their alma mater than graduates who found their campus career help “not at all helpful.”

So who found career services helpful and who didn’t? Those who studied humanities were the most likely to report disappointment — 22 percent said campus career-services were not helpful. That’s compared to 4 percent of engineering students.

And in a breakdown by race, the survey found white students were the least likely to use these services — 50 percent, compared to 65 percent of black students and 64 percent of Asian students. White students were also the least likely to report the services they got were “very helpful.”

Not surprisingly, the survey found that students who have high loan debt sought out career services in big numbers. But those deeply indebted students also reported very low levels of satisfaction with the services they received.

Continue reading

Education

After 50 Years, Head Start Struggles With Uneven Quality

Published by:

balance-schools_slide-7bac02ed019f884809a40f82c682c1426760f8c1-s800-c85
LA Johnson/NPR

For more than 50 years, Head Start has provided free early childhood education and other services to low-income families. But new national research, out Wednesday, shows great variation from state to state in how well the program works.

The study comes from the National Institute for Early Education Research, and it examined Head Start programs in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and U.S. territories.

It focused on quality and ranked states accordingly. Kentucky and Vermont came out the best, while 18 states ranked very poorly: Arizona, Alabama, California, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia and Wisconsin.

Continue reading

Education

What Former Employees Say ITT Tech Did To Scam Its Students

Published by:

itttech_final_small_slide-ce8115dff0eb00ffdbdf2703ff0749c72464c97e-s800-c85
Chelsea Beck/NPR

When he first moved to Miami, Waltter Teruel says, working as a recruiter for ITT Technical Institute was a welcome change from his life in New York where he had been selling antiques and life insurance.

As a recruiter, Teruel says, ITT Tech took care of the pitch to potential students for you. Recruiters used scripts set out in detailed PowerPoint presentations and got long lists of prospective students to call. But soon the welcome change faded. “Most of these students, they were looking for a job,” not more school, says Teruel.

When ITT Technical Institute closed, employees began to share tightly designed sales tools, like those PowerPoints, that offered a glimpse into the strategy that helped the company grow to more than 130 campuses across the country.

Continue reading

Education

Real Parents, Real Talk About Kids And Screens

Published by:

gen-listen-parents_slide-ecaf29d2fafb79552b3e56da1b0e7322246069a2-s800-c85
LA Johnson/NPR

We live in a world of screens. And in this digital age — with so many devices and distraction — it’s one of the things parents worry about most: How much time should their kids spend staring at their phones and computers? What’s the right balance between privacy and self-discovery?

Research continues to provide some answers on how parents are navigating this world. Just today, for example, there’s a new study out that looks at nearly 2,000 parents — who have kids ages 8 to 18. Among the most surprising findings: People with children spend, on average, 9 hours and 22 minutes per day in front of a screen: texting, tweeting, Googling, checking the weather.

And despite spending a big chunk of their day with a device, most parents — 78 percent — told the researchers that they are modeling good media habits for their kids.

The report’s biggest takeaway? Screen time isn’t going anywhere. So let’s talk about it.

Continue reading

Education

For College Students With Kids, Getting Cheap Child Care Is A Challenge

Published by:

m_fabrizio_collegesparents_custom-f45c864e702266d83f6e0da4483569dc49eea27b-s800-c85
Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Student parent.

Ever heard that term? It’s used for a student who is also a parent, and there are nearly 5 million of them in colleges around the country. That’s over a quarter of the undergraduate population, and that number has gone up by around a million since 2011.

It can be really, really expensive to be a student parent, especially if you need to pay for child care while you’re in class.

In some states, child care for an infant can cost as much as $17,062 a year, according to a report by Child Care Aware of America. Add that on to the ever-rising cost of college tuition — both private and public — and the financial strain of getting a college education becomes a huge burden for low-income parents. So much so that only a third of student parents get a degree within six years, often citing mounting debt as a reason for dropping out.

Continue reading

Education

Raising A Child With Dyslexia: 3 Things Parents Can Do

Published by:

hiding-from-reading_slide-c1009ec3e2ef004d1cda56ea0c73ab057db6f6a4-s800-c85
LA Johnson/NPR

A mother, who spent years coaching and encouraging her dyslexic son, recalls his childhood with one pervasive feeling: “It was really scary.”One father told me his home life was ruined. Trying to do homework with his struggling daughter, he says, felt like “a nightmare every night.” Optimism and determination would inevitably descend into tears and anxiety. The culprit: dyslexia.

Yet another mom — whose son and daughter both have dyslexia — suggests changing the definition of dyslexia: “It’s no longer a reading problem. It’s a life crisis.”

As the most common learning disability, dyslexia affects somewhere between 5 and 17 percent of the U.S. population. Its reach extends far beyond the classroom, causing stress, tension and confusion for families with a dyslexic child.

But experts and parents say there are three key things that can help.

Continue reading