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7 tips for having that difficult teacher conversation?

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Schools, despite being the most wonderful places to work,  can also be frustrating and painful places to be at times.

School leaders are charged with the responsibility of instilling the highest level of professionalism in their colleagues. Unfortunately, it is a undeniable fact that some teachers do a better job than others. The differences that one can see between teachers is wide-ranging. Some teachers are great at collaborating whilst others are reluctant to share and engage with others. Many teachers are great at giving students valuable feedback for learning while others are far less effective. A good number of teachers ensure that they act in the highest professional manner, however, we would be naive not to think that some teachers cut corners falling well short of their professional obligations.

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Education

How To Help Kids In Poverty Adjust To The Stability Of School After Break

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The first day back from winter break can be restless.

Many children are still coming down from the excitement of the holidays. Two unstructured weeks away from school — with strange food, rituals and relatives — can be overwhelming for many children, especially when it grinds to a halt after the new year and normality resumes.

But for students whose families are struggling in poverty, time away from school isn’t an exciting blip on an otherwise calm school year. For them, it can be a crippling time of insecurity when it comes to food and shelter.

And teachers can tell.

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Education

The 70/20/10 rule and considerations for teacher growth and development

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How do we most effectively promote the professional growth of our teachers so that it has a high impact on student learning?

While significant efforts are made in so many schools to improve teacher professional growth and learning, I continue to question how can we do this better?

Essentially, how can we ensure greater application of our own learning to ensure that it benefits our schools, teachers and students?

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Education

The Lesson Plan For A New School: Teaching ‘Joyous Service’

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Taylor Delhagen is one of the founding teachers at Brooklyn Ascend High School.

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The two births that would change everything for Taylor Delhagen were due to occur 24 hours apart. If all went according to plan, his school would come into being one day, and his first child would arrive the next.

The baby boy’s impending arrival had Delhagen contemplating the gravity of his role as a teacher opening a charter high school in one of New York City’s poorest neighborhoods: Brownsville, Brooklyn.

Four of the five founding teachers, the 31-year-old Delhagen among them, came together from a nearby charter, where they’d had success producing high test scores among low-income students. But they had felt stifled in what they see as a more vital task: developing human beings.

Now comes the chance for Delhagen to more freely offer an education he would want for his own son. He’s teaching in a community that’s four miles away — but in many ways a world apart — from Brooklyn’s gentrified Fort Greene, where rent on his family’s two-bedroom apartment just spiked 18 percent.

 

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Education

Does It Pay To Pay Teachers $100,000?

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We’re brought up to believe our teachers are modern-day saints.

Just look at how we portray them in the movies and on TV. From Dead Poets Society‘s iconic Mr. Keating to resourceful LouAnne Johnson in Dangerous Minds, we reinforce time and again that teaching is a noble calling.

These teachers are heroes, we’re told. It’s hard to imagine them even thinking about money.

But their real-life counterparts aren’t getting rich, either. The average pay for a teacher in the United States? About $56,000, usually higher in urban districts, lower in rural ones. Add the fact that salaries fell in recent years, and it’s probably no surprise that more teachers are leaving the profession, with fewer entering it.

And yet, here and there, in a few places around the country, some teachers have attained what has long been considered a mark of success in this country: a six-figure salary.

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Once all but unattainable, a six-figure salary is a reality for a growing number of teachers.

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Education

Hey, New Teacher, Don’t Quit. It Will Get Better

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Starting a new job is always tough — no matter the profession. But the first year for a new teacher can be brutal.

Research shows that roughly one teacher in 10 will quit by the end of that first year, and the toughest time — for many — is right now. In fact, this season is so famously hard on teachers that it even has a name …

Here’s a recent excerpt from the blog Love, Teach:

“Hello. Sorry it’s been so long. I seem to have fallen into DEVOLSON … an acronym I invented that stands for the Dark, Evil Vortex of Late September, October, and November. It’s kind of a homophone for “devil’s son,” which is intentional. I discovered that it’s the time of the school year where teachers are the busiest, craziest, and, usually the saddest.”

We first mentioned DEVOLSON a few weeks ago, when our colleague, Meg Anderson, wrote the post below and struck a chord with lots of teachers — and not just newbies. The response was so great that we decided to make a little DEVOLSON radio. Just click on the little triangle up there and let the fun begin.